Danish jihadists in Syria to have their childhoods investigated

Prime minister in favour of measures to restrict travel to warzones

The Ministry of Social Affairs has initiated an investigation into the backgrounds of 20 Danish citizens who have joined the jihadists in Syria. The targeted group are all people aged 15 to 23. The investigation will aim to identify patterns that might explain their radicalisation.

As part of the investigation, social workers will analyse the jihadists' childhood case files, assessing their school reports, criminal activity and other factors.

The social affairs minister, Manu Sareen, is fearful, he told Metroxpress, that these are not isolated cases, but part of a developing phenomenon.

READ MORE: Government to charge Syrian fighters with treason

National policy to prevent terrorist activity
The actions taken by the Social Affairs Ministry are part of a larger endeavour to prevent Danish fighters from joining the jihadists in Syria.

A 12-step plan, introduced by the Justice Ministry, to prevent radicalisation and terrorism in Denmark has been in action since September. The plan includes mentoring initiatives for individuals at a high risk of radicalisation, the involvement of civil society and Nordic cross-governmental collaboration.

High treason and travel bans
The treatment of returning jihadists is currently a hot topic in Parliament. Since a proposal last week by the justice minister, Mette Frederiksen, to charge jihadists with treason providing it can be proven they are fighting Danes, several parties have put forward their own suggestions regarding how to treat them.

Radikale has insisted charging the jihadists as traitors or terrorists, regardless of who they are fighting. While Venstre has proposed introducing strict controls on those wishing to travel to Syria and Iraq – an idea that the prime minister, Helle Throning-Schmidt, has voiced her approval of.

 





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