Hundreds of Muslims said goodbye to the Krudttønden shooter

After a short obituary, Omar Abdel Hamid el-Hussein was burried at the Muslim cemetery in Brøndby

Several hundred people gathered at the mosque on Dortheavej in the Northwest district of Copenhagen this afternoon to say farewell to 22-year-old Omar Abdel Hamid el-Hussein.

El-hussein was shot by Danish police on Sunday morning after he had killed two civilians and wounded five police officers.

Prayers for the assassin
While the regular Friday prayers were held in the mosque, a number of Muslims in winter jackets sat and prayed outside. 

According to the Islamic Society, twice as many people gathered in and around the mosque today than is usual for regular Friday prayers.

After a short obituary for the deceased, his white coffin was carried out of the mosque and placed in a hearse.

Police cautiously observing
Politiken reported that guards from the Islamic Society kept all spectators aside and cleared the way, so that the hearse could pass. 

As soon as the carriage began to move, the street echoed with praise of God and Muslims of all ages started calling 'Allahu Akbar'.

Two police cars stood at a petrol station nearby with about 10 officers cautiously observing the procession.

Burried in Brøndby
Omar Abdel Hamid el-Hussein was laid to rest at the Muslim cemetery in Brøndby.

About 200 men gathered around his grave, while a small excavator filled the pit with soil after the coffin with el-Hussein's body had been lowered into the ground. 

According to Politiken, some 400 people came to see the funeral.

About half an hour later, the crowd started to slowly scatter.





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