The childhood friends earning millions by repairing used iPhones

What started as a hobby has turned into a profitable business with 15 employees

Two childhood friends, Nino Friis and Julius Winther, have built a million kroner business repairing and reselling old iPhones, reports TV2.

In addition to running online store brugteiphones.dk, Friis and Winther are already opening their third physical shop next Monday. 

By the end of this year, they expect to have between eight to ten stores across Jutland, Funen and Zealand .

From a hobby to a profitable business
While Friis worked previously in a management position at TDC, Winther studied economics.

"Besides studying, Julius also repaired phones for his friends and family," Friis explained to TV2.

"Once, I went to his place to get my girlfriend's phone fixed, and that's when we got talking about whether we should start our own business."

Friis then quit his job and Winther dropped out of school. 

Growing fast
Initially, they only repaired broken phones, but soon they realised people were interested in buying used phones too.

They buy used and damaged phones for 450 kroner, fix them up and resell them.

Today, Friis and Winther have 15 employees and expect to generate revenue of 30 million kroner in 2015.





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