Vesterbro testing bin modifications to improve recycling

Project aims to help people collecting deposits and the environment

A social startup, KBHpant, is behind a project currently being trialled in Vesterbro to increase the number of recyclable bottles actually being recycled and to ease the lives of those who make a living collecting discarded containers to collect the deposits.

Three different models that allow recyclable containers to be separated from the rest of the rubbish have been put out on the bins in Vesterbro.

READ MORE: It's a dirty job, but somebody's gotta do it

Dual-purpose
Michael Lodberg Olsen, one of the organisers at KBHpant, described the dual purpose of the project.

“A lot of people are dependent on collecting deposit containers on the streets in order to maintain a decent livelihood, but far too many cans and bottles end up in the rubbish bin and never get recycled,” he said.

“We really want some of the money to come back to the collectors at the same time as creating more value around collecting deposits and focusing on recycling to help the environment.”

The project also has the support of City Hall. Morten Kabell, the deputy mayor for the environment, echoed Olsen’s sentiments about improving the lives of vulnerable members of society, as well as the environment.

“I’m looking forward to seeing the final solution in operation and I’m sure that Copenhageners will adopt it straightaway,” he said.

According to figures from the company that administers the deposit system on drinks containers, Dansk Retursystem, in 2013 there was 137 million kroner’s worth of deposits (pant) that weren’t reclaimed.

If the trials are a success, the scheme will be rolled out across the whole of Copenhagen.





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