International pilot group calls on members to boycott Norwegian

Norwegian pilots ask that those that cross picket lines be blacklisted

The international pilots' association IFALPA  is asking all its members to decline the chance to fly for Norwegian in place of the pilots who are currently on strike against the low-cost carrier.

The association's vice president Fanie Coetzee made his group's position clear in a statement sent to the union’s member organisations around the world.

“The number of pilots without permanent contracts is increasing and Norwegian is exploiting this,” read Coetzee’s statement.

Blacklist scabs
The striking Norwegian pilots have asked IFALPA to blacklist pilots who cross their picket line. Other foreign pilot associations have also issued statements of support for the striking pilots.

Other airport personnel unions including ground crews, security and other services have staged sympathy walkouts to support the striking pilots.

Around 650 pilots – including 100 Danish ones – have decided to go on strike after three months of unsuccessful negotiations regarding their deteriorating working conditions as the low-cost airline seeks to cut costs. 

READ MORE: Pilot Strike: 22 Norwegian flights cancelled

According to Jacob Pedersen, an aviation analyst at Sydbank, the pilots' strike will cost between 25 and 70 million kroner a day. 

Daniel Kirchhoff, Norwegian's communications consultant, estimates some 35,000 passengers will be affected again today.





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