Grandfather sentenced to life in prison for court shooting

Man convicted of September murder

The man who shot two people, one mortally, inside the bailiff’s court near Town Hall Square in Copenhagen was sentenced to a lifetime in prison at a court in Frederiksberg today.

The man, 67, was convicted of the murder of the lawyer of his former son-in-law and the attempted murder of his former son-in-law.

The court emphasised that the shooting had been premeditated and that the man had shown great recklessness.

READ MORE: Town Hall shooting the result of a family feud

Tighter security
The man explained in court that he had taken a sawn-off hunting rifle along to the messy divorce hearing to see how the case would develop. After the judge threatened to ban him from future hearings, the man pulled out the weapon and began firing, killing the lawyer, 57, and critically wounding his former son-in-law, 31.

”I deeply regret my actions and I am very sorry,” the defendant said according to DR Nyheder. ”And not because of the punishment either. I just didn't know how else to get out of it.”

According to the police, the case revolved around visitation rights to the divorced couple's child.

The shooting has led to a trial run involving increased security control in five city courts.





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