Danish men looking to Asia when marrying someone from abroad

Ladies from Thailand and the Philippines preferred to Swedes and Norwegians

When it comes to marrying someone from abroad, Danish men are finding love more frequently in Asia than they are in their own Scandinavian backyards.

According to national statistics keeper Dansk Statistik, Danish men married 276 women from Thailand and 195 women from the Philippines in 2014, compared to just 98 from Sweden and 91 from Norway.

Two-way street
Steen Baagøe Nielsen, a lecturer and researcher of culturally-mixed marriages at the University of Roskilde (RUC), contends there are many reasons why Danish men choose an Asian partner and vice-versa.

Danish men often yearn more traditional gender roles in a relationship and do not want to bother with the hectic Danish dating scene.

While relatively poor Asian women, who are willing to travel a great distance to improve their lives, might fast-track a holiday attraction or romance.

”In a world regulated by borders and quotas, marriage is one of the only options for a woman to get to a Western country,” Nielsen said.

”Considering the challenges, a surprising number of couples stay together. Both parties display great patience and tolerance by staying together. It's not just business. The vast majority of the men I've interviewed speak of infatuation and long-term love.”

READ MORE: Fewer marrying immigrants, more divorces and custody clashes

East, west, home is best
German women were the third-most popular choice last year with 118 marriages, followed by Poland (104), Sweden, Norway, Ukraine (60), China (54) and Russia (52).

The figures, however, still seem like a drop in the ocean compared to the 20,331 Danish men who married Danish women last year.





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