SAS changing cockpit regulations after Germanwings tragedy

In a reversal of last week’s statement, SAS will require two people in the cockpit of their planes at all times

SAS today decided to introduce new cockpit rules so that in the future there will always be two people in the cockpit of the airline's planes. 

This comes following a recommendation by Swedish aviation authorities recommending that airlines always have two crew members in aircraft cockpits.

"SAS will of course follow the recommendations immediately and implement the new rules,” SAS spokesperson Henrik Edström said.

Reversal of previous stance
Previously, rules allowed that a pilot could be alone in a cockpit if the other pilot needed to leave. SAS had said yesterday it felt its cockpit safety rules were adequate. 

SAS's follows an announcement yesterday by competitor Norwegian that it would change its cockpit policies.

"When one person leaves the cockpit, two people will now have to be there," said Norwegian's flight operations director Thomas Hesthammer.

READ MORE: At least one Dane on doomed flight

SAS is just one of a number of airlines to change cockpit routines as a result of Tuesday's plane crash in southern France, which was most likely deliberately caused by a co-pilot left alone in the cockpit.





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