Norwegian considering testing mental health of new pilots

Deadly French crash has carrier looking at checking mental health of applicants

Norwegian Air is considering introducing psychological testing of pilots before they can be hired. Currently, neither Norwegina nor its Nordic competitor SAS require psychological testing.

“We currently do not require such a test, but depending on how the debate develops, we may require one in the future,” Norwegian spokesperson Gudmund Taraldsen told TV2 Norway.

Tragedy leads to dialogue
Taraldsen said that the crash in the French Alps, apparently caused deliberately by co-pilot Andreas Lubitz who struggled with mental problems, has opened the door for considering the testing.

“It is likely to be debated in light of what has happened,” said Taraldsen.

READ MORE: SAS changing cockpit regulations after Germanwings tragedy

A Norwegian aviation oversight committee said that psychological testing prior to employment could be one of several tools used to prevent pilots with psychological problems from flying airliners full of passengers.





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