Copenhagen school kids nosh Michelin-quality food

Children get to judge the meals that might wind up on the school day menu

School children in Copenhagen had a chance to sample fare from the Michelin-starred restaurant Kiin Kiin today. Red curry with salmon, spring vegetables and jasmine rice were on the menu.

The kids then judged the food of the Nørrebro eatery as part of the EAT project that was started in 2009 as a way to create better tasting, healthier and more attractive meals for Copenhagen school children.

Kids choice
The taste test is a way to give the children more input into what winds up on their plates.

“We would like to introduce kids to dishes they are not necessarily used to,” Søren Buhl Steiniche, the head chef at EAT, told DR Nyheder. “We want to influence some of their eating habits.”

READ MORE: More organic food in day-care lunches

About 4,500 children from 40 different schools eat food from the  EAT program every day.





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