Over 1,500 people have sought asylum in Denmark this year

Most of them come from Syria

According to the Danish Immigration Service, 1,536 people have sought refuge in Denmark since January 1.

The number is comparable to the 1,523 refugees who applied for asylum in the country same time last year, and represents a clear decline compared to the autumn of 2014.

Significant decrease
Last year, Denmark experienced an explosive growth in the number of incoming refugees, with nearly 15,000 people seeking asylum in the country.

In September alone, some 3,150 people applied for asylum here.

The significantly decreased influx of refugees has been attributed to a number of factors – most particularly the government’s decision to tighten family reunification rules.

Most people seeking asylum in Denmark come from war-torn Syria.





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