Maersk ship released by Iranian authorities

Old debt case behind the ordeal

Danish shipping giant Maersk has confirmed that its container ship Maersk Tigris – including its 24 crew members – has been released by the Iranian authorities and is now on its way towards Jebel Ali near Dubai.

The ship was seized by the Iranian authorities as it made it way through the Strait of Hormuz on April 28.

“Maersk Line is happy and relieved to hear the news that the Maersk ship Tigris has been released by the Iranian authorities earlier today,” Maersk wrote.

READ MORE: Crew of Iranian-seized ship safe

Compensation case
Iran had announced earlier that the Maersk Tigris would be released as soon Maersk paid an old debt stemming from 2005 when the ship transported 10 containers to Dubai.

The containers were never picked up and were eventually auctioned off. But an Iranian firm complained and the Iranian government agreed in February that Maersk should pay about 1.078 million kroner in compensation.

Since then, the compensation amount had been raised to almost 24 million kroner, which Maersk was not aware of and had, as a result, not paid.

The Pentagon reported that the Maersk Tigris was forced into Iranian waters on April 28 after taking a course through the strait when shots were fired by the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps Navy (IRGCN). The ship was then seized after sending a distress call.





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