Millions set aside for sports for the vulnerable

18.5 million earmarked for troubled youth, the homeless and people with special needs

The culture minister, Marianne Jelved, has revealed the government has set aside 18.5 million kroner for street sports and sports for the vulnerable.

As part of the initiative, at least 10 municipalities across the nation will share 6.5 million kroner to establish street sports for vulnerable children and youth. The remaining 12 million is earmarked for sports projects for citizens with special needs, such as the homeless, drug abusers and those with mental disabilities.

“Many children and youths do sports through the associations, but there is a group of children and young who don’t take advantage of the association’s offers. This is where street sport offers a new and interesting alternative to activate kids in new ways,” Jelved said.

“Exercise contributes to better health and a higher life quality for everyone, including vulnerable citizens. Good experiences in sports communities can be the first step towards new networks and a better life, and it’s important to focus on people with special social needs.”

READ MORE: Football therapy for the homeless

Challenges ahead
The project is particularly focused on the challenge of organising the sporting community in a way that provides them with the opportunity to routinely take part in sports.

The initiative will last from 2015-2018.

The project comes on the heels of findings by Danish scientists last year that showed that football can dramatically improve the health of socially disadvantaged groups, including the homeless.





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