Danish baby products are full of dangerous chemicals

Six years since the Environment Ministry recommended reducing the use of materials with dangerous chemicals, the risks are still there

A new study by Forbrugerrådet Tænk (the Danish consumer council) reveals that every fifth product used by babies and small children contains chemicals that may cause cancerous tumors and developmental disorders.

READ MORE: Denmark to sue EU Commission over delays on dangerous chemical legislation

The independent consumer organisation examined 327 products in 13 different categories and found 22 percent of them contained dangerous endocrine disruptors.

Thought-provoking and scary findings
Anja Philip, the president of Forbrugerrådet Tænk, called the results “thought-provoking and scary”.

“There are many scientific studies indicating these chemical have endocrine-disrupting effects and thus should not be found in consumer products, especially not in products for babies,” Philip stated.

Babies are particularly vulnerable
In 2009, the Environment Ministry recommended reducing the use of materials containing endocrine disruptors in products for children under the age of two.

Six years later, however, the risks are still there according to the test’s results.

Babies and small children are particularly vulnerable because they often suck and chew on things, so the dangerous substances can be absorbed more easily.





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