This week’s weather: the typical Danish summer continues

Beach days are not on the horizon in this week’s weather forecast

Dreams of balmy summer nights sipping rosé on the balcony will have to be set to the side this week, as experts predict a week of traditional Danish summer weather – that is, rain showers and cloudy skies with the odd patch of sun.

According to DMI, this week’s weather will be a mixed bag, with temperatures ranging between 12 and 18 degrees.

“Monday and Tuesday will start out fine. We will experience mostly dry weather and periods of sun. North Jutland in particular may have some really fine weather,” duty meteorologist Lars Henriksen told Ekstra Bladet.

However, after Tuesday, you can safely leave the sunscreen at home.

“On Wednesday, it starts to go downhill. The rain will come in from the northwestern Jutland and cover the country, while wind speeds will increase coming in from the south and southwest,” Henriksen continued.

“And on Thursday, Friday and the weekend we will have periods of showers – but also some sunshine in between. Unfortunately, there is nothing to suggest that we will get what you would call good weather.”

Hope for Roskilde
Meteorologists assess that we must be patient if we want to see a sunny Danish summer.

“Unfortunately, there is nothing to suggest that the weather will stablise anytime soon,” ,” said Henriksen.

“We’ll probably be on the cool end of the scale over the next few weeks.”

However, according to DMI’s official website, temperatures look set to rise around June 24 – just in time for the Roskilde Festival.

All hope is not lost!





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