Election pork a hit in Christiansborg and in the kitchen

The election is a great opportunity to get stuck into one of Denmark’s traditional dishes

It’s the big election day in Denmark and that means truck loads of ‘valgflæsk’ (‘election pork’) – a Danish idiom for promises politicians make in order to get votes.

But it has also become a tradition in the culinary sense, as fried pork is being more ravenously devoured on election day than ever before.

Huge demands
The supermarket chain Coop expects to sell about 50 tonnes of ‘valgflæsk’ today, which is more than double of what the supermarket chain sells on an ordinary Thursday, reports Politiken.

Slaughterhouse giants Danish Crown is expecting even more significant increase in sales.

“This week, we have sold between five and six times as much bacon to canteens and restaurants than we normally do,” Jens Hansen, the communications manager at Danish Crown, said.

Overwhelmed by orders
Danish households have also been diligently buying the popular pork slices this week.

According to Hansen, Danish Crown has increased its sales in shops threefold since Monday and its employees had to work rigorously to accommodate the many requests.

“We have got so many orders for pork slices over the last few days that it has been a struggle to deliver,” Hansen noted.

Danes love pork
Even smaller shops have noticed the increased demands for ‘valgflæsk’.

A sandwich shop T. H. Sørensen in Amager has sold about four times more pork slices than usual.

“We have a lot of pre-orders. We’ve noticed that people are really getting into this and think it’s fun,” Kristine Strange, a co-owner of the sandwich shop, said.





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