Explosion in reports of radicalised prisoners in Denmark

The prison system lodged 59 reports regarding the radicalisation of 50 prisoners since the Copenhagen terrorist attack

Since the terror attack in Copenhagen in February, 50 prisoners serving time in Danish prisons have been reported to the Danish intelligence agency PET for being radicalised.

A report from the Justice Ministry in July showed the prison system lodged 59 reports regarding the radicalisation of 50 prisoners from February to May, up considerably from the just 37 prisoners reported during the past two years.

“Now we would rather report a prisoner too many than one too little,” Kim Østerbye, the head of the prison association Fængselsforbundet, told Metroxpress newspaper.

“We’re talking about prisoners who speak of going to Syria or decorate their cells with messages inciting terror. We have also begun conducting exit programs for radicalised prisoners the same way we would with gang members.”

READ MORE: A fifth of Danish jihadist fighters have been to prison

Dozens released
According to the report, 30 of the former radicalised prisoners reported to PET have been released from prison, while two have been expelled from Denmark and eight are under surveillance.

A report from the Justice Ministry in March showed that every fifth Danish jihadist fighter had been to prison at some point.





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.