Denmark’s largest ever environmental pollution case starting today

Four men are charged with illegally disposing of construction waste of an unprecedented magnitude

A trial stating in Glostrup today involves what Copenhagen Police is calling the largest ever case of environmental pollution in Denmark.

Four men stand accused of illegally disposing of 2,000 tonnes of construction waste around Zealand and the metropolitan area.

Unprecedented case 
The prosecution wants the defendants penalised according to criminal law for serious environmental violations, which carry a maximum sentence of six years in prison.

According to the police, the unprecedented case of extensive pollution took place from January to October 2014 when the four men were eventually arrested.

Over the nine-month period, the accused allegedly dumped rubble, asphalt and other construction waste from demolished houses at 20 different locations, including private land, parking lots and the countryside.

Systematic polluting
The prosecution believes the pollution was systematic and that the defendants benefited from it financially as they told clients they would dispose of the waste legally.

Normally, cases of environmental pollution are tried according to the Environmental Protection Act, which usually leads to just a fine.

This time, however, the prosecution wants a more severe penalty.

Two of the four men, who are aged between 33 and 42, are denying all charges and pleading not guilty.

A final verdict is expected in late September.





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