Danish youth are Euro champs at escaping from their parents

Just 43 percent of Danes aged 16-24 still live at home

When it comes to moving away from their parents, no-one in Europe does it as early as the Danes, according to new figures from EU statistics keepers Eurostat.

The stats reveal that only 43 percent of Danes aged 16-24 still live at the family home, a long way ahead of Finland, which ranks second on the list with 56 percent.

The reason can apparently be found in the history books.

“With the welfare state, we have built up a system and a welfare system that allows young people to live by themselves, which is a luxury not seen in many other nations, where they can’t afford to do so,” Lars Dencik, a professor of social psychology at Roskilde University, told KL union magazine Momentum.

“And the numbers [in those countries] have been made worse by the massive youth unemployment created by the financial crisis in southern Europe, which has led to many youngsters having to move back home again. Meanwhile, the number of young people studying in the Nordic nations has also increased.”

READ MORE: Young people confused by glut of continuing education choices

Affordable independence
The average age for moving away from home is also lower than the rest of EU by a stunning five years. On average, Danes move out when they are 21, only beaten by the Swedes, who are 19.6 on average. Conversely, the average age for a Maltese person to flee the nest is 30.

Among the reasons cited are the study benefits Danes receive, but according to Dencik, it is also about being independent.

“Danish youth want free space to decide for themselves: parents don’t need to know about them having a beer or bringing someone home at night,” he said.

“Parents also see it as positive that their children break free from them, like when they go backpacking during a gap year.”

KL

Nordic youth is quick to escape the nest (photo: Momentum)





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.