Denmark needs to double its investment in the space industry, advises DI

The organisation believes increased investments in European space projects would lead to significant economic growth and job creation in Denmark

Dansk Industri (DI), the Confederation of Danish Industry, has today recommended that Demark doubles its investment in space projects.

The organisation, which represents some 10,000 Danish companies, believes the space industry offers a huge untapped potential for economic growth and the creation of new jobs.

Investing less than Sweden and Norway
Currently, the Danish government contributes about 200 million kroner a year to the European space projects within the European Space Agency, ESA.

The amount is significantly lower than what Norway and Sweden are spending in relation to their gross domestic product, according to DI.

If Denmark was to match their investments, it would have to double its contribution.

Denmark is missing out
“By not investing more, we exclude Danish companies from being involved in ESA projects and we miss out on both growth and jobs,” Charlotte Rønhof, DI’s vice president, told Berlingske Business.

“Every time we send a krone to ESA, Danish companies get four and a half kroner back, so it makes no sense that we don’t invest more.”

READ MORE: Danish astronaut making final preparations for space

Producing star cameras
The Danish space industry has a turnover of 1.3 billion kroner annually and employs 730 people, based on figures from 2013.

Danish companies have contributed to the ESA projects with everything from magnetic components to star cameras and high-tech tights.

Next Wednesday, astronaut Andreas Mogensen will become the first Dane in space when he takes part in a 10-day mission to the International Space Station.





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