Danish nightclub tattooing guests on the dancefloor

Unethical and dangerous argues health and tattoo experts

There was some serious ‘murder on the dancefloor’ going on at the Copenhagen nightclub Jupiter last weekend as patrons were given the option to be tattooed as the bass pumped and the disco lights flashed about them.

Guests could pay 300 kroner to receive a quick five-minute tattoo about the size of a five kroner coin inked a tattoo artist from the Hermans Blæk Salon tattoo shop.

However, according to some present, there wasn’t any access to running water at the tattooist’s table, which was not closed off at all.

“I think this is completely grotesque. There are some clear guidelines in regards to hygiene and premises,” Lars Kristensen, the head of the national tattooist guild Dansk Tatovør Laug, told Metroxpress newspaper.

“If there wasn’t a possibility to wash hands and the access to the toilet wasn’t regulated, there could be a risk of some nasty E.coli bacteria.”

READ MORE: Nightclub ruffles feathers with Ebola party

Dumb and dangerous
Nasty and perhaps unethical, considering the drunken state of many of the guests, it may have been, but it wasn’t illegal. As long as people are over 18, it’s their own responsibility.

“Letting yourself be tattooed at a nightclub is not only stupid, but it’s dangerous too and should be forbidden,” Jørgen Serup, the head consultant of the tattoo clinic at Bispebjerg Hospital, told Metroxpress.

“Mixing alcohol and tattoos is simply foolish. You’re just asking for complications and there is an increased chance of infection.”

But for Jupiter, the tattoo gimmick was a huge success and the nightclub is considering putting another one on in the future.





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