Huge Danish telecom merger on the rocks

EU Commission demands too much for Telenor and Teliasonera

The two Scandinavian telecommunication giants Telenor and Teliasonera have shelved their planned merger in Denmark.

The two companies revealed that the decision was a result of the companies not being able to agree with the EU Commission on a plan to continue with the merger plans.

“Telenor and Teliasonera will continue to compete and deliver products and services in the Danish market via our respective Danish companies,” said Kjell Morten Johnson, the executive vice president for Telenor in Europe.

Earlier reports suggested that the EU Commission had demanded that the two companies sell off 40 percent of their network to another player on the Danish market before a merger could be approved.

READ MORE: Telenor and TeliaSonera merge Danish operations

Could have been great
The two companies had revealed in December 2014 that a merger would create a telecom operator that would be able to increase investment in networks and technology.

“From the start, we’ve been clear about the need to increase the investment level in Denmark,” said Robert Andersson, the executive vice president and head of European operations for Teliasonera.

“An establishment of a market player with the size and capacity to compete and invest would have ensured private and business customers considerably better quality, speed and coverage.”





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.