Defence minister voted Denmark’s most unpopular cabinet member

His half-lies and excuses have cost him nine places in popularity since the last polls in July

The defence minister, Carl Holst, has been voted the most unpopular minister in the new Venstre government, according to a new YouGov survey carried out for Metroxpress this month.

The results may come as a surprise to Holst, who ranked as the eighth most popular among the 17 ministers in the same poll carried out in July.

According to Henrik Qvortrup, a political commentator, Holst’s dishonesty and steadfast avoidance of certain issues is the most likely cause of his significant decline in popularity.

Tired of lies and excuses
“Carl Holst has managed to set a Danish record for going from one shitstorm to another. I can’t remember another minister starting out this poorly,” Qvortrup told Metroxpress.

“I think people are tired of his constant excuses and lies.”

READ MORE: Danish fighters may have caused collateral damage

Qvortrup believes Holst’s close relationship with the prime minister, Lars Løkke Rasmussen, and the humiliation of having to change a minister so soon after the general election, are the two main reasons Holst still has his job.

The three most popular ministers are currently Bertel Haarder (culture and religion), Karen Ellemann (social affairs and interior) and Kristian Jensen (foreign affairs).





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