Late-September Music: “Gorgeous” music from the Great Lakes

Great Lake Swimmers

Sep 26, 21:00; Lille Vega; 175kr

Originating from Canada, Great Lake Swimmers are great singers and songwriters. Their new album, A Forest of Arms, which includes some of their most dynamic tracks yet, explores ideas of natural beauty, environmental issues and personal ties through music.

Lead singer Tony Dekker also plays the harmonica, which paired with Erik Arnesenø’s banjo and harmonium and Miranda Mulholland’s violin gives the band a folksy feel.

Compared to Nick Drake and Neil Young, the BBC has rendered their music “gorgeous and rewarding”. (GB)


Synthpop:
BB King: In loving memory

(Photo by Heinrich Klaffs Collection)
(Photo by Heinrich Klaffs Collection)

Sep 24, 20:00; Amager Bio; 250kr

The best that Danish blues and beyond has to offer are coming together to honour the legend. The line-up includes Shaka & James Loveless, Otis Grand, Thorbjørn Risager and the Mike Andersen brothers. (EN)


Folk Rock:
Delta Rae

(Photo by Mark Hays)
(Photo by Mark Hays)

Sep 24; 21:00; BETA; 150kr

Touring to promote their latest album, After It All, this American folk rock band paints a picture of US history in an unforgettably unique way. Their concert promises big voices, powerful stories and special effects. (GB)


Punk:
Eddie and Hot Rods

(Photo from band's Facebook page)
(Photo from band’s Facebook page)

Sep 25, 21:00; Amager Bio; 200kr

Rock ‘n’ roll at its finest is coming to town! The fathers of UK punk have been hitting the stage for over 40 years now. That’s a whole lot of experience to show off at their first-ever show in Copenhagen! (LK)


Rock:
Korpiklaani

(Photo from band's Facebook page)
(Photo from band’s Facebook page)

Sep 28, 20:00; Pumpehuset; 175kr

This folk-turned-metal outfit from the Finnish forest is coming to blow us away with their woodwinds instruments, electric guitars and fearsome Slavic looks. Their uplifting music will make you jump out of your seat! (EN)


 





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