Substitute teacher numbers soaring following reforms

There has been a 31 percent increase over the past year

The number of substitute teachers being used by Danish public schools has increased by 31 percent over the past academic year, according to KRL, the department for municipal and regional payroll data.

But according to KRL, only 12 percent of the substitute teachers, who are mostly paid hourly, are actually qualified to teach.

Leaves holes in learning
“The long-term consequence is that students can miss some parts in the curriculum and these holes may be difficult to fill once permanent teachers return,” worried Mette With Hagensen, the head of Skole og Forældre, the association for schools and parents.

Teacher absenteeism is increasing across Denmark – not only due to the stress of increased hours but also because the recently-implemented school reform requires full-time teachers to upgrade their qualifications by attending teaching courses.





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.