US Ambassador Rufus Gifford marries partner Dr Stephen DeVincent in Copenhagen

City mayor happy that couple chose capital for their wedding

On Saturday Rufus Gifford, the US ambassador in Denmark, and his partner Dr Stephen DeVincent got married at Copenhagen City Hall.

READ MORE: New US ambassador arrives in Copenhagen

“In the land that created fairy-tales, we just started our own… Feeling such happiness and gratitude,” Gifford tweeted after the ceremony.

The pair welcomed more than 100 guests from around the world to celebrate the occasion with them at City Hall and later at the US ambassadorial residence Rydhave, north of Copenhagen.

Location significant
Gifford is an outspoken advocate of gay rights and has spoken at Copenhagen Pride about LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) politics in the US. It was significant for him, he explained, to be married at Copenhagen City Hall.

“It’s a very emotional day for us. Almost on this day 26 years ago, the first same-sex couple got married in the Copenhagen City Hall behind us,” he told BT.

Frank Jensen, the city mayor, conducted the ceremony and was delighted the couple had chosen the city for their big day given its role as a trailblazer for same-sex marriage.

“It sends an important signal that they have chosen to get married in Copenhagen. It is important for them and for Copenhagen, where it all began,” he said to BT.

Since taking up office in 2013, Gifford has become a well-known and popular figure in Denmark, especially following the airing of a six-part documentary on DR about the ambassador’s career and life in the country.





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