Annulled Zanzibar election raises Danish concerns

While Tanzania gets two thumbs up

The general election on the African island nation of Zanzibar has raised concerns, according to the foreign minister, Kristian Jensen.

The head of Zanzibar’s electoral commission announced the election had been annulled and a re-election would take place due to a number of irregularities. This comes despite all election observers confirming that the election took place peacefully and in a well-organised manner.

“I am concerned about the development on Zanzibar, particularly the head of the electoral commission’s annulment of the election,” said Jensen.

“I urge all parties involved to find a solution that respects the wishes of the public and for all responsible politicians to ensure that the situation doesn’t escalate.”

READ MORE: Denmark concerned about Burkina Faso developments

Tantalising Tanzania 
Meanwhile, Jensen congratulated Tanzania following its election on Sunday, which had a 68.2 percent turnout rate, compared to just 42 percent during the last election in 2010.

John Magufuli won the election after garnering 58.5 percent of the votes, while opposition leader Edward Lowassa gained 40 percent of the votes.

Via the UN, Denmark supports local democratic institutions to ensure a peaceful, transparent and legitimate election process. Furthermore, the Danes support a coalition of local election observer networks that deployed over 9,000 election observers on the day of the election.

In 2014, Denmark and Tanzania agreed to a new five-year development partnership to the tune of 1.95 billion kroner. The partnership aims to tackle poverty and equality, strengthen economic growth and job opportunities, and promote good governance, human rights and public access to social grants.





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