Nordic energy delegation eyes energy solution in Ivory Coast

Africa is one of the fastest-growing markets

A Nordic delegation of energy companies is currently in Abidjan, Ivory Coast to meet with a number of African financial institutions concerning the continent’s future energy challenges.

The three-day seminar is being attended by representatives from 15 Danish, Norwegian and Finnish companies and organisations within the energy sector, including Kamstrup, BWE, BWSC, IFU, Enviscan, COWI and Danish Gateway.

“The strong growth in Africa and increasing energy demand is the basis for the visit,” explained the Foreign Ministry.

“The energy sector in Africa has not grown at the same pace as the population in the region, and as Africa remains under-supplied – with under half of the population living without access to a stable energy source – there is a huge challenge getting enough energy in the future.”

READ MORE: Danish delegation eyeing sustainable future in South Africa

Full program
The program (here in English) in Abidjan this week includes visits to several energy plants including the CIPREL refinery, Akouedo Biogas, the Azito Thermal Power Plant and the SOLIBRA/Carlsberg building.

Furthermore, Maersk Line will be at hand to give the delegates a first-hand look at the infrastructure by sailing the delegation up the Ebrié Lagoon in Abidjan.

The seminar has been arranged by the Danish Embassy in Accra in co-operation with the African Development Bank and Ivorian centre for the promotion of investment in Ivory Coast (CEPICI).





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