Danes still buying Volkswagens despite emissions scandal

October sales up for beleaguered automaker

Although over 90,000 cars in Denmark are affected by the Volkswagen emissions scandal, the automaker’s market share in the country actually increased last month.

According to industry magazine Motor, Volkswagen’s official importer Skandinavisk Motor Co (SMC) reported an increase in sales.

October was the first full month after the scandal broke in which VW admitted to using onboard software manipulation to falsify emissions amounts worldwide.

Semler Group’s SMC also handles Audi, Skoda and Seat.

Boss not surprised
SMC head Ulrik Schönemann was not surprised by the sales figures for all four brands, of which VW is still Denmark’s leading seller.

READ MORE: Record number of cars being sold in Denmark

“We have used many resources and been extremely active in the past month keeping our clients apprised of the situation, so customers are not as negative about the situation as the press,” Schönemann told Motor.

Of the brands handled by SMC, only Skoda has shown a slight dip since the scandal broke in September, with sales slightly down in that month.

Overall, SMC imports account for 11.7 percent of the Danish market – a 0.75 percent increase on the same period last year.





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.