Danish Foreign Ministry advises against traveling to Sharm el-Sheikh

The Foreign Ministry announced on Friday that it was advising against all non-essential travel to the troubled region

The Foreign Ministry announced on Friday night that it was advising against all non-essential travel to the southern part of the Sinai peninsula.

Holiday from hell
The peninsula’s southern tip, Sharm el-Sheikh, is a popular holiday destination, but may not remain so for long.

A Russian aeroplane was recently brought down over the region by what many are now claiming was an IS bomb.

Reports also claim that a British passenger aircraft was almost brought down at the end of August by a missile that it took evasive action to avoid.

On the heels of SAS
The ministry’s announcement came following SAS’s decision on Thursday to cancel all flights to the region.

SAS – taking heed of the advice coming from the foreign offices of Britain, Russia, the Netherlands and France – decided to cancel its flights on Thursday despite there being no warning from the Foreign Ministry about the need to do so.

Customers booked on cancelled flights were found alternative flights by Danish travel companies, but they were denied refunds.

The companies in question have now cancelled all of their package tours and are working on getting people back from Sharm el-Sheikh with the help of Danish Air Transport and Primera Air.





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