Copenhagen Municipality votes to end co-operation with Islamic society

Some local politicians fear the move will hamper anti-radicalisation efforts

Copenhagen’s municipal council voted on Thursday evening to end all co-operation with the Danish Islamic society Det Islamiske Trossamfund, Berlingske reports.

READ MORE: City Hall threatens to stop co-operation with Islamisk Trossamfund

The proposal to boycott the organisation, which was carried by a vote of 30 to 23, was made by Socialdemokraterne, Venstre, Liberal Alliance and Konservative and follows the group’s recent decisions to invite controversial preachers to Denmark.

Risky strategy
However, since the proposal was made earlier this week, concerns have been voiced that the move to end co-operation with Det Islamiske Trossamfund could jeopardise anti-radicalisation efforts in the city.

Ahead of the vote, Anna Mee Allerslev, the deputy mayor for integration and employment, highlighted the good working relations the organisation and City Hall have previously enjoyed.

“Det Islamiske Trossamfund has repeatedly shown its value and willingness to co-operate in the work against hate crimes and radicalisation,” she said.

“It’s actually quite unique we have such good co-operation with religious organisations here in Copenhagen, and we should safeguard it.”

Socialistisk Folkeparti’s Sisse Marie Welling put it more bluntly.

“It’s shameful that Frank Jensen and Socialdemokraterne put political symbolism ahead of our city’s safety and insist that our frontline workers can’t prevent radicalisation in extreme circles,” she said.





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