Only tiny pesticide levels found in Danish fruit and veg

Samples taken from organic samples showed no residue at all

If you’re looking to reduce the amount of pesticides you’re unwittingly ingesting, then sticking to Danish goods is a probably a commendable start.

A new report from the food authority Fødevarestyrelsen (here in Danish) has revealed that Denmark continues to be the cream of the crop when it comes to pesticides in fruit and vegetable produce.

“The fine results from the Danish pesticide control underlines the solid food product security that is becoming a Danish trademark,” said the food minister, Eva Kjer Hansen.

“The Danish gardeners and fruit growers are proving year after year that they really have control over pesticide use in all chains of production.”

READ MORE: Danish invention capable of massively reducing pesticide use

Organic success
Even when pesticide residue is found in Danish produce, it’s far below the limits compared to foreign fruit and vegetables.

Out of the 2,510 samples tested, 179 were from organic products, which yielded no pesticide residue finds.

Furthermore, the food institute DTU Fødevareinstituttet estimates the pesticide residue found in food products on the Danish market should not be of a health concern to the consumer.





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