Public sector getting stingy when it comes to Christmas gifts

If you expect a present from your employer, you have a better chance with a private company

Christmas is a time when many employers reward their loyal workers with a gift thanking them for their service over the year.

Nine out 10 private employers spread a little Christmas cheer, according to Dansk Erhverv, the Danish Chamber of Commerce.

Employers in the public sector are not quite as generous. Many, in fact, choose not to give holiday gifts at all.

Not with taxpayer’s money
At Esbjerg Municipality, there is a policy of not giving a gift, although individual departments may do so if they choose.

Esbjerg’s personal and development head, Birgitte Stenderup, said that giving employees presents may not be the most effective use of the taxpayer’s money.

“Gifts are, of course, a way of giving a pat on the back,” Stenderup told DR Nyheder.

“But we are a municipality, and I do not think that is a proper way to use our funds, so we look for other ways to make our employees feel valued, and not just at Christmas.”

More generous in Jutland
Gifts to public sector employees seem to be more commonplace in south Jutland. A survey conducted by DR South showed that more than half of the large public workplaces give employees a gift for Christmas, including the municipalities of Fanø, Sønderborg, Aabenraa and Varde and some local hospitals.

READ MORE: Minister: Pay for your own Christmas party mishaps

“People are excited that they can take a gift home that shows their family that they are valued by their workplace,” said Tom Ahmt, the deputy head of Aabenraa Municipality.





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.