“Suspicious” passenger removed from flight to Paris yesterday

Comments from a passenger caused pilot to ask Kastrup authorities to force man to leave the plane

Comments made by a male passenger on a flight bound from Copenhagen to Paris made his fellow passengers so nervous that airport authorities removed the man and his luggage from the aircraft.

“The captain made an announcement that there had been a suspicious man on board,” a witness told BT.

Copenhagen Police said the man was not Danish, and that they did not know his nationality.

“He apparently said something that generated insecurity,” said police spokesperson Michael Andersen. “The captain asked that he be removed, and his luggage was taken off and examined.”

Captain uncomfortable
It is unknown exactly what the man said, but police said the captain told them that he did not want to fly with the man on board.

Witnesses said the man went quietly with police, and that he was released after his luggage was examined.

The flight, which was scheduled for a 3:45 pm departure, was in the air by 4:30 pm.

“It may have been an uncomfortable situation for the other people on board, but from our side it was quite undramatic,” said Henrik Stormer, also with the Copenhagen Police.

“It is not like he ran down the aisle with a spear, so we questioned him and sent him on his way.”

Minimal drama
The police and airport authorities said they considered the case closed.

“The man has already flown out of the country on another aircraft and is somewhere in the big wide world,” said Stormer. “It is a dead issue for us.”

READ MORE: Terminal 3 at Copenhagen Airport evacuated due to a suspicious package

No other flights were affected by the incident.





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