Danes spending more on Christmas gifts for kids

A survey carried out by Megafon for TV2 shows 42 percent of Danish parents intend to spend over 1,000 kroner on Christmas gifts for each child.

Some 17 percent said they would spend more than 1,500 kroner per child on presents.

Experts warn children may learn that buying expensive gifts is a necessity to show love and consume a lot more growing up.

Showing love
“I think it is a lot of money, especially since we are talking about Christmas gifts,” Louise Skjødsholm, a senior financial consultant at Penge og Pensionspanel, told TV2.

“But then I guess people are just trying to do their best, and by buying big presents they think they show how much they love each other.”

READ MORE: No half measures from Julemand this year

Less for adults
Skjødsholm believes buying more expensive presents goes hand-in-hand with children’s preferences for things such as iPhones, brand clothing and gadgets.

Heidi Agerkvist, a child psychologist, said there are other ways to show love and that always giving children what they want may affect them negatively later in life.

Although Danes spend more on their children, they tend to use less money on gifts for adults, and many refuse to participate in the Christmas race, according to Skjødsholm.





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