Justice minister to block phone signals in prisons

Søren Pind is debating the move after reports emerged that a convicted terrorist is still active on social media.

The justice minister, Søren Pind, is considering blocking mobile phone signals in prisons after it emerged that a convicted terrorist has been active on the net from inside one.

Active on social media
“We will have to examine this one case thoroughly before I can say what we intend to do about it,” DR reported him as saying.

“But one of the concerns we have is trying to jam signals sent from inside the prison.”

The 19-year-old convict, who has been in custody for more than 10 months, has been subjected to rigorous inspections and checks – however, it appears that he has been able to access the internet and has been active on his social media accounts from inside prison.

Neither Copenhagen Police nor the prison service, which operates the country’s prisons and detention centres, would comment on the case.

 





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