Wind energy in Denmark breaking world records

Some 42 percent of energy produced in Denmark came from wind

Energy produced by wind turbines in Denmark made up 42.1 percent of the total electricity consumption in 2015, reports Berlingske.

Denmark thus sets a new world record because the ratio is the highest compared to how much wind energy is produced anywhere else.

Getting close to targets
The country is well on the way towards reaching its target of producing 50 percent of energy from wind by 2020.

In 2005, wind turbines in Denmark produced 18.7 percent of the total electricity consumption. In 2010, the share increased to 22 percent. And in 2014, the percentage jumped to 39.1.

Danish power plants that burn coal or biomass still play an important role in supplying electricity, but solar and wind energy production is continuously growing, according to Carsten Vittrup, a consultant at Energinet.dk.

Cross-border energy trade
A wind power share of 42 percent does not automatically mean that 42 percent of electricity coming out of sockets in Danish households was produced by wind turbines.

Energy is constantly traded across borders and Denmark sells some of its wind power to Germany, Sweden and Norway.

On the other hand, the country buys hydropower from Norway, solar power from Germany and nuclear power from Sweden.





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