Membership numbers spiraling at Denmark’s latest church

The Flying Spaghetti Monster Church is gaining converts

Who said religion was ‘pasta’ its best in Denmark? Because since Sunday, members are flocking to join a new church in Odense, the Flying Spaghetti Monster Church.

The church opened up its membership rolls on Sunday evening and collected 160 followers, 10 more than is needed to be officially accepted as a religious community in Denmark.

“We have received many inquiries,” Fabian Krarup, the head of the Flying Spaghetti Monster Church, told DR Nyheder. “It’s possible to remain a member of the state church, but still help us out.”

A weak and stupid god
The Flying Spaghetti Monster Church believes in pirates, has a weak and stupid god, and its members are fond of pasta, obviously, and rum.

The church was founded in the US in 2005 as a response to the demand for teaching intelligent design in schools.

READ MORE: Alternative Danish church officially state-approved

In New Zealand, the church has already been accepted as a religious community.

The Danish version of the church must first define a marriage ritual and prove that it is not just a fad before it can follow suit.

Krarup hopes it will be recognised as a religious community before September.





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