Government inks emergency healthcare package

415 million kroner to improve conditions at nation’s hospitals

The government has teamed up with Dansk Folkeparti, Liberal Alliance and Konservative to present a new 415 million kroner emergency healthcare package.

The package, which will last until 2019, will be spent on more doctors and nurses (250 million), an influenza vaccine guarantee (60 million) and better patient conditions at all A&E departments nationwide (88 million).

“I’m pleased there was a broad consensus about improving the situation immediately,” said the health and elderly minister, Sophie Løhde.

“The emergency package will help alleviate the problems involving patients sitting in hospital hallways and where that issue is greatest – in the medicinal and geriatric departments.”

READ MORE: Danish hospitals’ medicine expenses lower than expected

Part of the package
Other aspects of the emergency package include 15 million kroner for local efforts and tools and 2 million kroner for uniform monitoring and an evaluation system in all five regions to address the numbers of patients being cared for in hospital corridors.

The package is the first part of a national action plan for elderly medicinal patients that the government has set aside 1.2 billion kroner for.





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