Danish men agree: Aarhus has the most beautiful ladies

‘The City of Smiles’ beats the rest of the competition

Copenhagen may very well offer up some of the most lovely bits of architecture, history and culture in the fair lands of Denmark, but when it comes to fostering the most beautiful ladies, the capital can pack it in.

A new YouGov survey on behalf of Metroxpress newspaper has revealed that Danish men believe the most beautiful women hail from Aarhus.

“They are good, sensible girls with solid Jutland genes,” Jannick Lindberg, the head of modelling agency Le Management, told Metroxpress newspaper. “Aarhus girls are smiling and energetic – that’s a communality.”

“They are happy and easy-going, and they like to rock the natural look, which I think is appealing. They’ve always said that Aarhus has beautiful girls – although I think we have lots of pretty girls all across Denmark.”

READ MORE: Danes are not as beautiful as they think

Proven track record
Some 28 percent of Danish men pointed to ‘The City of Smiles’ – as Aarhus is known in Denmark – as having the most lovely ladies. Just 21 percent pointed to Copenhagen, while Aalborg scored 16 percent and Odense 10 percent. Some 25 percent of respondents pointed to other parts of the country.

The official line could prove the Danish men correct. The current Miss Denmark is 17-year-old Jessica Hvirvelkær, who hails from the Risskov district in Aarhus.

And the very first ‘Miss Denmark’ in 1924, Edith Jørgensen, also came from Aarhus. Perhaps there is something in the water over there.





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.