Student case competitions increasingly popular

Companies use them as a recruitment tool when looking for young talents

Companies, educational institutions and professional organisations in Denmark are increasingly encouraging students to participate in so-called case competitions, in which students have to solve specific business tasks, reports Politiken.

While some competitions are open to all students, others are only offered to a selected group of students with the best grades and motivation.

“It is our experience that the phenomenon is growing and more and more people are becoming aware of the benefits of organising this type of competition,” Charlotte Rønhof, the vice president of Dansk Industri, told Politiken .

Thomas Hvergel Jensen, the head of a career centre at the Aarhus University School of Business, confirms companies have been using case competitions as a popular recruiting tool since the financial crisis.

CBS was first
Copenhagen Business School (CBS) was the first to introduce case competitions in Denmark in 2002 and has been using them systematically every year.

CBS also sends many of its best students to compete abroad.

Trade unions, such as Djøf, annually hold two to three competitions for its members, who are selected based on their CV and application.

Yasmin Davali, the president of the Danish student union, warns student competitions may put even more pressure on students and contribute to a high-performance culture.





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