Copenhagen’s roads lead the way in generating speeding fines

P Knudsens Gade yielded 22.6 million kroner last year

Four roads in the Copenhagen area are among the nation’s top five for yielding the most fines, according to new figures from the state police Rigspolitiet.

P Knudsens Gade in the capital’s Sydhavn district topped the list, generating 22.6 million kroner in speeding fines last year, followed by Funen’s Motorway (19.7 million), central Copenhagen artery HC Andersens Boulevard (19.5 million), Lyngby Omfartsvej (18.4 million) and Roskildevej in Frederiksberg (15.5 million).

“One of the reasons we see so many fines on P Knudsens Gade is that we have acquired digital equipment in 2015,” Allan Teddy Wadsworth-Hansen, a spokesperson for the traffic department of Copenhagen Police, told Metroxpress newspaper.

“All our radars needed to be recalibrated and we used P Knudsens Gade because we are sure we can measure there during the day. It is also near our headquarters so we can easily offer support should a problem arise.”

READ MORE: Over 10,000 drivers caught speeding during last week’s nationwide checks

More licence clips
Another likely reason is that there is a stretch of P Knudsens Gade in which the speed limit drops from 60 to 50 km/hour, which many drivers oversee.

Denmark’s 12 police districts handed out 64,952 drivers licence clips (three and you lose your licence) in 2015 – an 8 percent increase compared to 2014.





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.