Copenhagen sees first negative population influx in over a decade

69 more people left the Danish capital than moved there in 2015

For the first time since 2001, Copenhagen is actually losing people, according to figures from the national statistics keeper Danmarks Statistik.

The figures showed that 69 more people had left the Danish capital than moved in by the end of 2015. Many families with children are relocating to other parts of Zealand, such as Roskilde, Køge, Hillerød and Helsingør.

“A deciding factor behind these figures are that families with small children – who want to leave the city but are hesitant to sell their apartment and purchase a house during a recession – are now beginning to move out,” Hans Skifter Andersen, a professor of housing and welfare at Aalborg University, told Politiken newspaper.

READ MORE: Copenhagen’s homeless population decreasing

Minus 4,000 by 2020
If the development continues, about 4,000 more people will have left Copenhagen than moved there by 2020.

In 2014, 764 more people moved to Copenhagen compared to those who left.





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.