SAS cancels 800 flights by mistake

Travel agencies will have to rebook deleted reservations

Scandinavian Airlines has cancelled 800 flights on five different European routes by mistake due to a system error.

The problem has already been corrected and all the travel agencies and sales agents that booked tickets for passengers on the affected routes have been informed and advised to make new reservations.

Anna Vibeke Nielsen, a communications consultant at SAS Denmark, said the airline regrets the extra work the system error has caused to its partners.

The affected flights are scheduled for routes from Copenhagen to Gdansk, Gothenburg and Vilnius, and from Bergen, Brussels, Gdansk and Vilnius to Copenhagen in the period between May 14 and August 31.

The routes are operated by SAS partner carriers Cimber and CityJet.





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