Out and About: Young innovators court business entrepreneurs at speed matching event

Startups and mentors flocked to Venture Cup’s speed matching event at CBS last week on Thursday. Not too dissimilar to a speed dating event – but with less cologne – the participants were keen to find their ideal match.

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“We have an Iphone and Android app now – it’s been growing really fast! We’re looking for a kick-ass mentor: someone who has experience in running a global business,” said Stian Haanes (left) from Too Good To Go, along with Adam Papalia Sigbrand (centre) and Klaus Bagge Pedersen (right)

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Cycle Savers is another startup-to-watch. Co-founder Tobias Gebetsberger explained the business concept: “If you have a problem with your bicycle, you can use our application and order a freelance mechanic. We are here to find a mentor: someone who can help us with scaling up the project.”

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Twenty-seven different startups participated in the quick-fire pitches, all optimistic that their snappy rhetoric would nab them a Danish Alan Sugar. Hopeful ventures included Match My Thesis, Billetfix, Planet Local and Music Stories

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“It’s really interesting how the startup scene has developed in Copenhagen over the last five to ten years,” enthused Thomas Ebdrup, a mentor from Operate, a strategic communications company based in Norrebro.  “We are seeing more foreigners coming here because they find it is a good environment in which to start a company. There is a big community … an open culture of helping each other, and there also seems to be a lot of capital available.”

 

Solveig Felbo from Rahandel says she is hoping to find a mentor with experience in the food industry:“ There are a lot of food startups here that I am surprised about – I’ve already spoken to one guy, previously a venture capitalist, who has given me some really good feedback.”





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