Danish female entrepreneurs numbers double

More young women starting their own business

The number of young Danish female entrepreneurs has doubled over the past 10 years, according to figures from the Danish Business Authority.

In 2005, some 532 women under 25 registered a new company. Ten years later, that figure had increased to 1,061.

Christian Walther Øyrabø, the chairman of the Danish Association of Entrepreneurs, has called the trend “incredibly positive” and said it shows young people have realised starting their own business provides an attractive alternative to a regular job.

READ MORE: More young Danes starting their own business

More young entrepreneurs
Last year, 14 percent of all new companies in Denmark were registered by young people aged under 25, while in 2005 they accounted only for 8 percent.

Young men started 4,364 businesses last year, which was more than double compared to 2005, when they registered 1,898 companies.

Every year, Denmark’s business portal Ivækst awards talented entrepreneurs the IVÆKST prize in a number of categories, including one that highlights successful business women.

According to Bastian Grostøl, the communications co-ordinator at Ivækst, the agency wants to challenge more women to start their own company.





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