State-of-the-art air laboratory opens in Copenhagen

New lab will facilitate advanced research on air pollution

Copenhagen is to become home to Europe’s most advanced air quality laboratory for researching air pollution, which is claimed to annually cost 7 million lives around the world. The company Infuser, which develops air purification solutions, is opening a 400-sqm laboratory in Copenhagen University’s Universitetsparken facility in Østerbro.

READ MORE: Copenhagen getting a smart city lab

The new lab will feature advanced measuring equipment, including a chemical ionisation mass spectrometer, which can measure pollution levels down to one particle in a billion, and instruments that can sort minutely sized particles.

Every pollution problem is different
Lars Nannerup, the CEO of Infuser, explained that such analysis is vital for the company’s work.

“Every new case, every new pollution problem, represents a new challenge and every installation needs adaptation, so it can remove the particular cocktail of gasses coming out of the individual production process,” he said.

“The product, as well as the company, is still very much in the development phase, so we are deeply reliant on a continued collaboration with the university where the idea was first fostered. We develop all our technology in collaboration with researchers at University of Copenhagen.”

The company has 25 employees, the vast majority of whom are chemists or engineers, and expects to take on a further ten scientists in the course of the next six months.





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