Danish power network to be expanded

New power lines to Germany and the UK will cost over 11 billion kroner

Denmark will invest over 11 billion kroner into an extensive expansion of its electricity network with Germany and the UK.

Energinet, a non-profit agency under the Danish Ministry of Energy, Utilities and Climate, has already informed the municipalities that will be affected by the construction work.

“What we need in Denmark is to be able to trade power from abroad and vice-versa,” Torben Glar Nielsen, the technical manager at Energinet, told JydskeVestkysten newspaper.

“Wind turbines, of which there are plenty in west Jutland, have been built faster than we expected, and so we need to continue with the expansion of the electricity grid. This way we will also improve the power supply in Denmark.”

Both in the ground and air
In order to boost electricity trade with the UK, Energinet plans to run a 760 km power cable in the ground from Revsing near Vejen across southwest Jutland and into the North Sea – an 8 billion kroner investment that is expected to be completed in seven years.

At the same time, Energinet wants to establish a new 400 kilovolt power line in the air from Idomlund at Holstebro across Endrup near Esbjerg and down to the Danish-German border at Niebüll.

This project will cost about 3.3 billion kroner and is expected to be finished in six to seven years.





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