Foreign biker gangs setting up shop in Denmark

Police say new gangs are looking to become part of the nation’s criminal underworld

A growing number of foreign biker gangs are getting a foothold in Denmark. The number of bikers rolling through the Danish countryside has exploded in the just the past three years.

The Black Jackets, Gremium and United Tribuns Forever have rolled in from Germany. No Surrender and Satudarah from the Netherlands have also opened clubhouses in Denmark. Danish police believe that the gangs are here for just one reason: Crime.

“I have no doubt that the foreign clubs want to enter the Danish criminal market and set up their own territories,” Michael Kjeldgaard, the head of investigations for the national police force Rigspolitiet told TV2 Nyheder. “I have no doubt that that is what this is all about.”

READ MORE: German biker gang opens chapter in Denmark

Monopoly broken
Until 2013, the Hell’s Angels and Bandidos had Denmark pretty much to themselves. Then the Dutch gang Satudarah opened a clubhouse in Bagsværd.

Police speculated that the more established biker groups allowed the Dutch to move in because they did not want to attract attention by starting a bloody biker war.

“When Satudarah was permitted to come to Denmark and establish itself, I think other groups saw that there may be opportunities in Denmark,” said Kjeldgaard.

But that fragile peace was broken last month when members of the German gang Gremium had their clubhouse put on lockdown by South Zealand and Lolland-Falster Police after a shootout with members of rival gang Brothas.





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.