Europe’s latest Reformation is taking place inside the IKEA kitchen

A Copenhagen-based design company will transform IKEA kitchens and cabinets into world-class design furniture at a snip of the price.

Reform is redefining the concept of a kitchen, transforming it from a place of functionality into an innovative space of aesthetic Danish design.

Along with the help of some major design deities, including Bjarke Ingels and Henning Larsen, the company is revolutionising the kitchen industry with its democratic approach to high design.

Affordable price tag
The company was founded in October 2014 by Jeppe Christensen and Michael Andersen with the aim of making top-class design accessible to everyone at an affordable price tag.

“The kitchen is one of the most important rooms in our home,” said Christensen.

“But it is often overlooked when it comes to design. We want to change this. Our goal is to give everybody the opportunity to experience extraordinary design.”

Simple concept
Reform’s concept is a simple one: customers purchase their desired kitchen cabinets at IKEA, then select from Reform’s fronts and tabletops, which are then just clicked into place.

There are four high-designs to choose from, including Norm Architects’ raw kitchen creation using fiber-concrete, bronzed tombac, and smoked oak.

Co-founders Christensen and Andersen’s swift recognition of a gap in the market for custom-made kitchens has meant Reform is rapidly expanding; with a recent cash injection of $1 million (6.53 million kroner), the company has just opened a new office in New York and shortly in Berlin.





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